blue-author:

thegreenwolf:

People often think of fire as a destructive force, and it can be. But fire also rejuvenates the land. Many grasses have evolved root systems that survive fires so they can be renewed, and some trees and other plants have seeds that only germinate after a fire has come through. Plus fires clean out old dead wood and other debris, making it easier for fresh plant life to grow. 

It’s like a picture of the tide coming in, somewhere in the Elemental Chaos.

blue-author:

thegreenwolf:

People often think of fire as a destructive force, and it can be. But fire also rejuvenates the land. Many grasses have evolved root systems that survive fires so they can be renewed, and some trees and other plants have seeds that only germinate after a fire has come through. Plus fires clean out old dead wood and other debris, making it easier for fresh plant life to grow. 

It’s like a picture of the tide coming in, somewhere in the Elemental Chaos.

Reblogged from prudabega

rorschachx:

Representatives from Kazakhstan, Mongolia, Russia, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan and UN bodies meeting in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, have agreed an international conservation pact for the migratory saiga antelope. Saigas numbered around 1 million animals in the early 1990s, but declined to between 60,000 and 70,000 in 2006, largely due to a sharp rise in poaching after the collapse of the former Soviet Union. The horns of males are in high demand for traditional Asian medicine, especially in China and parts of south-east Asia | source

rorschachx:

Representatives from Kazakhstan, Mongolia, Russia, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan and UN bodies meeting in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, have agreed an international conservation pact for the migratory saiga antelope. Saigas numbered around 1 million animals in the early 1990s, but declined to between 60,000 and 70,000 in 2006, largely due to a sharp rise in poaching after the collapse of the former Soviet Union. The horns of males are in high demand for traditional Asian medicine, especially in China and parts of south-east Asia | source

Reblogged from rorschachx

last-snowfall:

weareallmedie:

firedanceryote:

reptila-tequila:

qeilla:

thefreckledavantgardegoober:

mysticmisfit89:

Meanwhile, in prehistoric Canada…..

No no, you don’t understand, moose really do get that big. Take it from a Canadian. I’ve seen that bullshit in person. Scary as all heck.

And that’s how people can die if they hit a moose. Seriously, one of our fears when driving in the country is having to deal with this scenario of a moose jumping out in front of the car.

moose are actual legit ice age megafauna; theyve been here since the ice age, they are old as fuck. they also are pretty terrifying and ive echoed this before but i went to wiki and “In terms of raw numbers, they attack more people than bears and wolves combined” and “ In the Americas, moose injure more people than any other wild mammal and, worldwide, only hippopotamuses injure more.”

like, fuck off with that

I was dog sitting a dog once who insisted she had to go out in the middle of the night it was an emergency, so I took her out. Suddenly she starts pointing and barking and I look up and can just make out the outline of a HUGE moose. I’ve been accidentally face to face with a black bear and that scared me less than being up close with a moose. I’m 5 foot so imagine staring up at an animal several feet taller than you that is debating charging the dog who’s leash you are holding. I was terrified as I grabbed the dog by her collar to get better control over her and backed up slowly til I was out of line of sight and bolted for the house at a dead run. Did you know most Canadian lake monster stories come from people seeing moose swimming? They are massive animals.

They are massive and they charge. I get so scared when tourists are all “oh yeah, we got out of the car to get a closer look and, ya’ll have some mighty impressive animals around here.”

Yes, yes we do, and they have mighty tired guardian angels because moose can, and do, charge at people.

I’ve always said that moose hunting season is the one time of the year we’re allowed to fight back.

Someone my mom worked with died hitting a moose on the highway. Their eyes don’t reflect light. In the dark they are literally nothing but a big slightly darker shape in the night.

Roughly every year in the town I grew up in, a cow (moose) and her calf will wander through downtown. Maybe once or twice. If she’s aggressive enough, the local Mounties will escort her through to keep idiots away.

Reblogged from prudabega